The International Steam Pages


Steam at the Emsland Moormuseum in Gross Hesepe 

Historically steam power was used to extract peat either for burning or for drainage purposes, such equipment was not dissimilar from that used for steam ploughing and similar specialised traction engines were often used. Thomas Kautzor took these pictures at the museum in May 2013, their website is http://www.moormuseum.de/. I am grateful to Dick Eastwood of the Steam Plough Club for the information which I have quoted at the bottom of this page. 


Heinrich Lanz was a major maker of agricultural machinery in Germany. it is currently part of the John Deere Group (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Lanz_AG).. 

Assman and Stockder specialised in making portable engines (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assmann_%26_Stockder), this appears to be a peat burning over boiler engine:

 

Pride and joy of the museum is the ploughing equipment which remained in use as late as 1970, the size is quite extraordinary:

There are two engines preserved here:

These two engines have a complex history, which is perhaps not completely accurately reflected in the notice which describes them in the museum.

These two engines have a complex history, which is perhaps not completely accurately reflected in the notice which describes them in the museum.

Their more recent history is not in doubt, they are Henschel-Ottomeyer engines 5185 and 5186 built in 1953 in Wilhelm Ottomeyer's workshops at Bad Pyrmont using new Henschel boilers which allowed their power rating to be greatly increased. The cylinders, crankshafts and winding gear were of new manufacture by Ottomeyer, the rest of the engines utilised pre-existing parts from engines which had been scrapped. These engines are known as 'Thuringen' which is where they originated from when they were bought in by Ottomeyer. Another similar pair named 'Magdeburg' survive - one at Auto & Technik Museum Sinsheim e.V. and the other at Schwäbisches Bauern und Technikmuseum, Eschach-Seifertshofen, the latter is in working order.

There are other rebuilds (five survive, three in Germany and two in the UK) known as Kemna-Ottomeyer engines from 1958-9 with new boilers from Gronemeyer & Banck of Brackwede, the rest being a mixture of old and new parts from Kemna engines (from Breslau)..

Since the origin of the parts to make the first group is not known, it is not impossible they incorporate parts from Fowler ploughing engines, Fowler having their European base at Magdeburg which was absorbed by Wolf following WW1, hence their engines often had the appearance of Fowlers.


Rob and Yuehong  Dickinson

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